Blogging to Resume

I managed to get all three writing projects wrapped up on-time, so I should have more time to blog in the near future.  Of course, at this point I’m not sure what I’m going to write about.

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Jonathan Goff

Jonathan Goff

President/CEO at Altius Space Machines
Jonathan Goff is a space technologist, inventor, and serial space entrepreneur who created the Selenian Boondocks blog. Jon was a co-founder of Masten Space Systems, and is the founder and CEO of Altius Space Machines, a space robotics startup in Broomfield, CO. His family includes his wife, Tiffany, and five boys: Jarom (deceased), Jonathan, James, Peter, and Andrew. Jon has a BS in Manufacturing Engineering (1999) and an MS in Mechanical Engineering (2007) from Brigham Young University, and served an LDS proselytizing mission in Olongapo, Philippines from 2000-2002.
Jonathan Goff

About Jonathan Goff

Jonathan Goff is a space technologist, inventor, and serial space entrepreneur who created the Selenian Boondocks blog. Jon was a co-founder of Masten Space Systems, and is the founder and CEO of Altius Space Machines, a space robotics startup in Broomfield, CO. His family includes his wife, Tiffany, and five boys: Jarom (deceased), Jonathan, James, Peter, and Andrew. Jon has a BS in Manufacturing Engineering (1999) and an MS in Mechanical Engineering (2007) from Brigham Young University, and served an LDS proselytizing mission in Olongapo, Philippines from 2000-2002.
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9 Responses to Blogging to Resume

  1. Eric Collins says:

    Did you arrive at any new or interesting insights in the course of putting together these projects?

    I think your most interesting posts have been those dealing with the enabling capabilities of in-space infrastructure. Perhaps you could expand on that theme. Or, how about exploring some of the trade-space of space tugs and crewed orbital vehicles? I would be interested in seeing some realistic numbers on size and mass of these vehicles for a given amount of delta-v (i.e. to and from L1/L2/LLO).

    One of the points made in that paper by Wendell Mendell (that I linked to in the comments in one of your earlier posts) was that the L1 stations came out superior in almost every respect. The main thing which makes an L1-station impractical at the current time is the lack of vehicles to transfer supplies and crews. Any thoughts?

  2. Adam Greenwood says:

    Why don’t you put a Skribit widget in your sidebar, then folks can make writing suggestions to you?

    (grins)

  3. Eric,
    Yeah, I actually got a lot of insight. Unfortunately a lot of it is stuff I can’t talk about. The AIAA Space 2009 propellant depot paper still needs to be written (the deadline was just for an abstract), but I think we’ve picked a good approach that will tie things together well, but still be short enough (12-15 pages) that it’s readable. Some of the stuff in the paper is new, and I don’t want to spoil the surprise. As for the SBIR proposal, it involved some technologies that I’ve been wanting to develop for a long time, but haven’t had the funding/bandwidth to work on. Unfortunately those also fall under the “don’t want to talk about until I have a contract in-hand”.

    As for the whole LLO vs L1 trade, I keep coming back to ascent/descent risks. If we’re ever going to get to a point where transportation costs become reasonable, we have to start reusing everything. Which implies single stage landers, with something like the lunar ejector seat I previously discussed in case of a stage failure. If you bail out and end up stranded on the lunar surface, or in lunar orbit, you need rescuing ASAP. Not in a day, but within 1-2 hours if at all possible. L1/L2 just can’t do that. So, even if it only ends up being used for SAR purposes, having an LLO mini-station or three makes a lot of sense.

    ~Jon

  4. Martijn Meijering says:

    “If we’re ever going to get to a point where transportation costs become reasonable, we have to start reusing everything.”

    What price point do you think is possible in the 2020-2030 timeframe? I’ve seen suggestions of $1000 / kg for bulk materials and maybe twice that amount for valuable cargo / manned spacecraft. Based on some of your remarks elsewhere I suspect you are thinking of a much lower price point.

  5. Martijn,
    Fundamentally, over the next 21 years I don’t see any physical reason why we couldn’t see prices getting as low as $200/kg for delivery to LEO (for people, hardware, or commodities).

    My big focus on lunar development is trying to find a way to get the cost of lunar access low enough that economic experimentation (and settlement) are feasible. To me, that means the ticket price to the lunar surface needs to be under $10-20M per person (for economic experimentation), and down to ~$2-5M per person for settlement. Right now prices are closer to $500M per person. We have a long way to go.

    ~Jon

  6. Adam:

    There is a Skribit account widget on this blog. You have to scroll down a ways.

  7. John Schneider says:

    Guess who missed the sarcasm here?

  8. Adam Greenwood says:

    Not sarcasm. Gentle ribbing.

  9. “”””””””Guess who missed the sarcasm here?””””””””

    Owe, I C.

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