Admission of Failure

guest blogger John Hare
In 2001 a couple of us incorporated a company called Near Space Transport. It lasted less than six months. The basic idea that we could buy rocket engines from one supplier, jet engines from another, and have an airframe company build a sub-suborbital craft was flawed. The design may have worked eventually maybe, the financial side would (with hindsight) not.

I lost a few dollars and no one else did. I was able to get some of the financing transferred to my construction company. By two years ago, I had put together a good work team with good equipment and client base. I was in a position to start financing some small technical hardware, I thought. The construction industry is not healthy right now and a good team etc means you might be able to weather the storm, not spend chunks of change on a rocket hobby. I estimate at least two years before my business can be in a position to do what I thought I was going to do five years ago.

I have a number of aerospace concepts and opinions that I would like to put out there. These are not calls for action or an insistence on being taken seriously, just ideas that could use feedback. I consider it an admission of failure that I am trying to write instead of building hardware.

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johnhare

johnhare

I do construction for a living and aerospace as an occasional hobby. I am an inventor and a bit of an entrepreneur. I've been self employed since the 1980s and working in concrete since the 1970s. When I grow up, I want to work with rockets and spacecraft. I did a stupid rocket trick a few decades back and decided not to try another hot fire without adult supervision. Haven't located much of that as we are all big kids when working with our passions.
johnhare

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johnhare

About johnhare

I do construction for a living and aerospace as an occasional hobby. I am an inventor and a bit of an entrepreneur. I've been self employed since the 1980s and working in concrete since the 1970s. When I grow up, I want to work with rockets and spacecraft. I did a stupid rocket trick a few decades back and decided not to try another hot fire without adult supervision. Haven't located much of that as we are all big kids when working with our passions.
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2 Responses to Admission of Failure

  1. Adam Greenwood says:

    As a gardener, I’m aware that failure, well-watered, becomes the compost in which plants grow.

  2. ken anthony says:

    I’d like to second that manure. I believe that SpaceX’s three failures will make it a much better company in the long run. When things come too easy, it probably means a more spectacular failure down the road. Results require both action and thought. Some people spend too much time thinking, others too much time acting. Nature seems to enforce a balance.

    I look forward to enjoying your articles.

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