ISDC Tracks

by guest blogger Ken

Hey everyone! I’m just up working late on the ISDC, and thought I’d give you a taste of the latest stress: program tracks. We’ve still got a few kinks to work out, but as I put this thing together I’m realizing that we have collected some amazing programming. Since we’re still working behind the scenes to get the “official” track layout finalized so that everyone is comfortable with putting it up on the main website, I’m going to give the regular visitors to the Selenian Boondocks a sneak preview of what’s in store. Remember, this is still notional, and I’ll probably get a half-dozen screaming e-mails over the next few days, but wow, what a conference!

Friday – Frontier Transport Day

Transport:
2-4pm
Risk & Space Tourism – Derek Webber
Selecting Launch Sites for Adventure – Wayne Finger
NASTAR Center (Private Space Travel Training) – Alex Howerton
Infrstructure for Civilian Space Training Center – Marshall Gardner
4-6pm – Joint Session w/Moon Track

Moon & Cislunar Space Development
2-4pm
Value of LEO Propellant Depot for Lunar Exploration – Dallas Bienhoff
The Challenge of Commercial Cis-Lunar Development: Where We Are, Where We Want to Go, and Some Thoughts on How to Get From Here to There – Jon Goff
Orbital Characteristics of Very Large Flexible Structures – Jim Dempsey
The Roadmap of Cislunar Space – Ken Murphy
4-6pm
Cislunar Transportation & Logistics – John Strickland
Reactions to NASA’s Lunar Exploration Architecture -Options & Alternatives – David Dunlop
Panel on Lunar Logistics – Implications – John Strickland et al

The Martian Frontier
Virtual prototyping of a piloted Mars Lander – Mark Paton
The Four-Month High Arctic Mars Mission – Dr. Robert Zubrin
MarsDrive – Bruce MacKenzie
Why a Humans-to-Mars Mission Costs Over $50 Billion NASA-Bucks… And How We Can Do Much Better! – Brian Enke
Artistic and robotic principles for the synthesis of Martians for Mars exploration – Shogo Yonekura and Yoichiro Kawaguchi

ISS Science
Research on the ISS: Current Accomplishments & Future Potential – Julie Robinson
The ISS at Assembly Complete: NASA, National Laboratory, and Int’l Research Partner
Extra-Terrestrial Medical Care: Earth Applications
Space Nutrition Lessons from the ISS and Implications for Future Exploration
Coarsening of Solid-Liquid Mixtures
Particle & Smoke Detection on ISS for Next Generation Smoke Detectors
Capillary Flow on ISS
ISS Participation in the International Polar Year
Gravity Dependent Combustion & Fluids Research: From Drop Towers to Aircraft to the ISS

Space Settlement
Space Settlement in the Context of Human History
Space Settlement Economics & Advocacy
Panel: What’s Going on NOW Toward Settlements in Space
Triggering Events for Space Settlement
Human Expansion Triway into Space
Contests/Competitions Available for Student Participation ion Space Settlement Design
Involving the arts in Space

Education I – Angelo Casaburi
Engineering Design Challenges 1: Spacecraft Structures
Robonautics: Humans and Robots
Engineering Design Challenges 2: Thermal Protection Systems
STS-118 – First Spaceflight of an Educator Astronaut

Education II
Teaching from Space: Utilizing the ISS as the Ultimate Platform for Education – Jon Neubauer
Amateur Radio Communications with ISS – Reaching Students Worldwide – Frank Bauer/Ken Ransom
NASA Glenn Research Center & Hathaway Brown School Collaborative MISSE Experiments – Kim deGroh
Past, Present, and Future ISS Research for Educational, Commercial and Basic Science Purposes – Louis Stodieck/Stephanie Countryman
Developing the Future Leaders of the Global Space Community: International Space University at 20 – Steven Brody
Teachers in Space – Space Frontier Foundation

Space Law
Liability and Risk Management for Spaceflight Companies – Doug Griffith
ITARs – Kerry Scarlott
Insurance for Launch Operators and Builders – Kelly Alton
Insurance for Launch Operators and Builders – Ralph Harp

Saturday – Moon Day

Frontier Transport
Electromagnetic Launchers – Ian McNab
Ram Accelerator – Carl Knowleen
Update on Superconductivity & Applications – Giovanni Grasso
Sky Dock – Phillip Putnam
Space Elevators for Earth & Moon – Jerome Pearson
Panel: Other Ways to Space

Moon & Cislunar Space Development
NASA’s Lunar Exploration Architecture Planning: Mapping Objectives, Missions & Architecture for the Science Mission, Exploration Systems & Operations Directorates – Laurie Leshin
Inflatable Deployable Structures for NASA Exploration – Cliff Wiley
Finding Lunar Polar Ice: Next Orbiters & Ground Truth at the Lunar poles – Paul Spudis
Moon Rush – Reasons for Lunar Development – Dennis Wingo
The OutPlan Report: The Business Case for Resorts & Retirement Homes – David Koch
The University of Luna Project – Peter Kokh & David Dunlop
Let’s Go to the Moon & Set Up Shop – Rick Tumlinson

The Martian Frontier
Mars Exploration Entry, Descent and Landing Challenges – Dr. Robert Braun
Phobos and Deimos as Stepping Stones Between the Moon and Mars – Dr. Pascal Lee
4Frontiers Corporation – Creating a Path for the Settlement of Mars – Joe Palaia
Sensitivity and Trade Studies for Mars Cargo and Crew Transportation – Grant Bonin
Virtue and the Opening of a New World – Bishop James Heiser
The Social and Political Structure of an Early Martian Colony – Kurt Chankaya

ISS Science
Physics of Colloids Experiments on the ISS
The Crew Earth Observation Experiment: Earth System Science from the ISS
Characterization of Microorganisms in Spacecraft Environments
Effects of Spaceflight on Microbial Gene Expression & Virulence
Results from the Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiment Onboard MISSE-5
NASA Glenn Research Center’s MISSE ISS Experiments
Progress in Spacecraft Environment Interactions: ISS Operations and Development
Lessons Learned From ISS Operations

Space Settlement
The Antarctic Base is not a Good Model for the Lunar Base
Closing the Life Support Loop: What is Stopping Us?
Orbital Fuel Depot
Solar Power Satellites
Back to the Moon by 2015 – This Time to Stay: How toAssure Early Human Presence Toward a Permanent Moon Base
Architecting the Future: Thinking Outside the Box

Space Business
Developments in the COTS Program – Panel Discussion with Participants – Alan Lindenmoyer / SpaceX / Rocketplance Kistler
Prospects for Financial Success of Commercial Transportation Services to the ISS – Dominic DePasquale
OTHER TRANSACTIONS: Space Act Agreements and Partnering with NASA – David Schuman
FAA Office of Commercial Space Transportation: Latest Developments – Dr. George Nield, FAA AST (or Patricia Grace Smith)
What Entrepreneurial Launch Companies are Looking for in a Spaceport – Wayne Finger
Reality Check: Lunar Commerce 2007: How to Be Taken Seriously – Dr. David Livingston

Education I – Angelo Casaburri
Rocks From Space
(a.k.a. Lunar and Meteorite Science and Certification)
Exploring the Solar System: Mars and Beyond

Space Outreach
Space Advocacy – Strategic Aspects – Bob Armstrong/Howard Bloom/Bart Leahy/Jeff Foust/George Whitesides
Space Advocacy – Tactical Aspects – Greg Allison, Hal Fulton, Bill Ledbetter, Jim Plaxco, Veronica Zabala-Aliberto
Space Advocacy – Integration Aspects – Mix of above panelists

Sunday – Mars & Beyond Day

Frontier Transport
A Realistic & ViablePath to LEO – Robert Talmadge
A Heavy Hauler to the Moon – Air Launch – Carleton L. Rhoades
Low Cost Propulsion Solutions: Commercial History of Liquids & Hybrids – Tim Pickins
Panel: Who Will Solve! (the cheap HLV Problem – Cargo CATS)
Basics of Orbital Mechanics – Seth Potter
Fusion Power/Fusion Drives (Bussard Tech) – Tom Ligon

Moon & Cislunar Space Development
Growing Food in Extreme Environments: Running a Green House at the South Pole – Lane Patterson
Planning a Lunar Greenhouse – Phil Sadler
Concrete from Lunar In Situ Resources – T.D. Lin
Inflatable Deployable Structures for NASA Exploration – Jerome Pearson
Demonstrating Large Facility Computer Automation in Analog Lunar Habitat Operation – Michael Bakk
Lunar Analogue Development – Peter Kokh
Lunar Synthesis Session: Lessons learned -Ken Murphy & Peter Kokh

The Martian Frontier
The Phoenix Mission – Peter Smith
The Effect On National Security of a Modification in the President’s Space Initiative Regarding Mars – John Boyton
Mars EDL Architecture / Spaceport Design and Powered Descent Terrain Mapping for Pinpoint Landing – Jeremy Sotzen
Finding Useful Minerals and Mining on Mars Isn’t That Easy – Vernon Kramer
Fiction on the Martian Frontier: Behind the Scenes of the 4Frontiers Fiction Writing Project – Brian Enke

Space Settlement
Evolutionary Psychology and its Implications for the Future of Humans in Space
Earthlings on Mars: The Physiological Psychology of Cultural Change
How to Settle the Solar System in 3 Easy Steps
NSS/Ames Space Settlement Contest Winners

Space Business
Exopolitical Implications, Commerce, Mining Ops and Historical Preserves on the Moon and Mars – Dr. Joseph A. Resnick
Attracting Capital: What Most Space Startups STILL Don’t Understand – Thomas Andrew Olson
Immediate Market Applications of a Cheap-Launch Technology – Benjamin Joseph
Rocketplane Kistler – topic TBD – Charles Lauer
Fill ‘Er Up: Economic Analysis of A Lunar In_Situ Resource Utilization Propellant Services Market – Dominic DePasquale
Barely affordable SPS using ISRU in LEO – Paul Roseman
Synergies Between Earth and Space Businesses – Dennis Wingo
Web based collaborative engineering design and documentation – Mitchell James

Education I – Angelo Casaburri
Engineering Design Challenges 1: Spacecraft Structures
Robonautics: Humans and Robots
Engineering Design Challenges 2: Thermal Protection Systems
STS-118 – First Spaceflight of an Educator Astronaut

Faster than Light
Gravity Modification – Benjamin T. Solomon
FTL Communications Demo – Guenter Nimtz
Panel: FTL Travel – Guenter Nimtz/Bill Gardiner

There’s still more, but I think y’all get the picture. If you haven’t registered yet, the last chance to do so online is Sunday – otherwise you’ll have to register at the door and that’s the most expensive option. Our volunteers need time to get all of the registrant materials together.

That’s one thing to keep in mind – this is all put together by volunteers. A lot of folks have done a lot of great work so far behind the scenes. And this is just the track programming…

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9 Responses to ISDC Tracks

  1. Ray says:

    I might suggest a late-breaking ISDC speaker (or award winner, or special guest, or Ad Astra subject) – Peter Homer, the independent engineer who just won the Astronaut Glove Centennial Challenge. I don’t know his story, but I have a feeling it goes right to the core of what the NSS is all about (as well as what NASA Centennial Challenges are all about). Maybe you can get him to bring the astronaut gloves to display, too.

  2. susan says:

    I found some great fiction book reviews. You can also see those reviews in Historical fiction

  3. John Carmack says:

    I think I am there on Friday some time to talk about Armadillo Aerospace…

  4. murphydyne says:

    Hi John!

    You’re one of the special cases that gets to speak in the Big Room.

    All of the folks listed on the Speakers page at the ISDC website are going to be speaking throughout the weekend in the Big Room, which seats somewhere in the neighborhood of 750+ persons, or the meals (which are only about 400 seaters).

    The 3 Premiere tracks – Transport/Moon/Mars are in about 200 seaters, as are the ISS Science and Space Settlement tracks. All the rest, such as Astrosociology or the Arts in Space tracks, are in 100 or 50 seaters.

    NSS HQ is managing the Big Room, so George at HQ could give you a better idea of your time (since I’m showing you on Moon Day). I do know that there are still some follow-ups that haven’t closed, so we’re not set on the Big Room schedule. We do have the meal speakers confirmed:

    Lunch-
    Thu: Esther Dyson
    Fri: Buzz
    Sat: Eric Anderson
    Sun: Rusty

    Dinner:
    Fri: Ben Bova
    Sat: Steve Squyres(award-recipient)
    Sun: Jack Schmitt

    I’m getting excited about the book-signing area, as many of the speakers who are also authors have agreed to sign their works for the public (such as Mr. Schmitt).

    I’m also excited about seeing the Quad Lander. We’re thrilled that you’re willing to schlep it all the way to the hotel to show it off (and I’m thrilled that it will fit in the freight elevator, we’re pretty sure). I think the DARS guys are pretty excited about having a big shiny rocket display nearby. Especially since Launch Magazine is going to be there on a Press Pass. I’m pretty sure we get a bunch of free magazines to hand out as well, and we did get a nice ad in the latest issue.

    All these details – it’s like trying to ride a tornado.

  5. Mike Täht says:

    All those lovely tracks…

    … and not one talk on near earth asteroids.

  6. murphydyne says:

    Very true. You’ll also notice that there’s not a whole lot of deeper space stuff either.

    On the first front there are a couple of factors at play:
    1) I was not able to convince everyone else that Asteroids as a resource merited its own track. There was much concern early on about having too many tracks, and our notional track guide for the Call for Papers did mention asteroids, but I can’t remember if it was in the context of the Beyond part of ‘Mars & Beyond’ or ‘The Solar System Beyond’ (Mars).
    2) John Lewis was on our wish list of speakers from the beginning, and I got texted during the recent space industry thingee in Colorado asking about him specifically. I responded that heck yes we need him at ISDC, though to the best of my knowledge he will not be there. A shame as I have several of his books in the Lunar Library that I wanted to get autographed.
    3) Not a whole lot of asteroid papers submitted. As I noted, there were additional tracks to be finalized, and my co-chair has the full master super-duper layout that I’ve been trying to mirror as a cross check. When I see the final final layout I’ll be able to answer better.

    In relation to #1 was the dearth of Solar System content, much to the despair of my co-chair. I sent out e-mails to all of the local JPL Solar System Ambassadors, and heard nary a peep, even they had really come through for us on World Space Week a few years back. The Planetary Society co-ran the conference last year in LA. I don’t know, you tell me.

    And it’s not like I can give a talk on them. I nearly lost my speaking slot in the Moon track.

  7. Mike Täht says:

    re: 1) I was not able to convince everyone else that Asteroids as a resource merited its own track.

    I don’t think they merit their own track, either. I was just hoping for a talk…. All I ever hear from Griffin is “First the moon, then Mars, then the Near Earth Asteroids” – and thus, by the time the government gets around to exploring NEOS… I’ll be long dead.

    There was much concern early on about having too many tracks, and our notional track guide for the Call for Papers did mention asteroids, but I can’t remember if it was in the context of the Beyond part of ‘Mars & Beyond’ or ‘The Solar System Beyond’ (Mars).

    Well, with that framing of your context, Near Earth asteroids don’t fit either, as many come much closer to Earth than Mars and a few closer than the Moon.

    That’s been my larger point for years, that given the delta v required to reach a NEO, with reachable candidates having favorable conjunctions on a weekly basis (so if you miss a launch, you can retarget) (rather than a 4 year basis for Mars), that they were more suitable for short term exploration by alt.space… but I run on.

    2) John Lewis was on our wish list of speakers from the beginning, and I got texted during the recent space industry thingee in Colorado asking about him specifically.

    I would love to hear any updates he had to “Mining the sky”, especially as, since the publication of that book, we have tripled the number of known large NEOs and more than septupled the number of known smaller ones

    … and we also have the results back from Deep Impact and Hayabusa.

    3) Not a whole lot of asteroid papers submitted. As I noted, there were additional tracks to be finalized, and my co-chair has the full master super-duper layout that I’ve been trying to mirror as a cross check. When I see the final final layout I’ll be able to answer better.

    Not a whole lot meant there were some?? What would it take for a lonely asteroid advocate to get a look at what you rejected?

    And it’s not like I can give a talk on them. I nearly lost my speaking slot in the Moon track.

    I have been working up a talk, but it’s entry level, starting with a picture of the modern solar system as seen from jupiter, and working in – I have no place to deliver it, and certainly possess not the authority of Lewis or Steven J Ostro –

    but I think it’s rather late for me to get into this party, at least this year. 🙂

    Ah well, I’ll enjoy the rest of the conference, which is looking quite interesting.

  8. Roger Clandon says:

    Interesting follow up on UP Aerospace’s launch from Spaceport America on April 28: Seems that at the last minute, the new Spaceport Director, Rick Homans (formally the NM Secretary of Economic Development)got a little nervous about the launch and decided to move the aim point 5 miles to the west (because safety is number one). Jerry Larson, President of UP Aerospace, was against the move but was told to either move it or don’t launch. As a result, the payload is now in the mountains west of the range and has yet to be recovered (almost two weeks later). The place where they think it came down is less than two miles from flat open land – Thanks a lot Rick. Next time just shut up and color and let technical people make the technical decisions, you moron! Yet another reason why we have to get spaceflight out of the hands of beaurocrats.

  9. Roger Clandon says:

    Interesting follow up on UP Aerospace’s launch from Spaceport America on April 28: Seems that at the last minute, the new Spaceport Director, Rick Homans (formally the NM Secretary of Economic Development)got a little nervous about the launch and decided to move the aim point 5 miles to the west (because safety is number one). Jerry Larson, President of UP Aerospace, was against the move but was told to either move it or don’t launch. As a result, the payload is now in the mountains west of the range and has yet to be recovered (almost two weeks later). The place where they think it came down is less than two miles from flat open land – Thanks a lot Rick. Next time just shut up and color and let technical people make the technical decisions, you moron! Yet another reason why we have to get spaceflight out of the hands of beaurocrats.

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